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Articles by and about Angel Hanz for the Homeless

All newspaper articles written by Karen "ANGEL HANZ" Hamza are geared towards assisting the homeless and their pets with educational tips and information.  

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 ANGEL HANZ for THE HOMELESS - NO CITIZEN ACTIVIST IN THE NORTH HOLLYWOOD AREA HAS DONE MORE! BY EXPOSE HOMELESSNESS



Helping Hands for the Homeless

The Tolucan Times - Angel Hanz for the Homeless helps local pet and people
Karen Hamza knows what it feels like to be alone and without support, as several years ago she was faced with homelessness. She also knows that the love and support of her dog during those times helped lead to her recovery. Hamza then singlehandedly decided to find a way to help others and founded Angel Hanz for the Homeless, a unique 501c-3 non-profit dedicated to bettering the lives of homeless individuals and their animals.
Without any formal training or business background, she brought her compassion to the streets. Her organization provides food, clothing and supplies to the homeless and their animals, as well as veterinary care and haircuts. Additionally, she has authored a resource guide for the homeless and their animals.
Hamza understands that homeless people come from different places but end up at the same place—homeless. This is why the organization is dedicated to an approach focused on education and solutions. All the while working tirelessly to rescue abused animals and keep them out of killing shelters.
The organization hosts its gathering the last Sunday of every month at North Hollywood Park located at 11455 Magnolia Blvd. in North Hollywood.
Angel Hanz for the Homeless is a grassroots organization in need of clothing, animal food and supplies, blankets, financial donations, a nurse, a groomer, a van, a job recruiter and a building for gatherings.
Financial donations can be made via PayPal and their Amazon wish list is available at AngelHanzLA.blogspot.com or directly at P.O. Box 10716 Burbank, CA 91510. Call (818) 358-3663 for more information.

Unwanted dogs find homes among the homeless

 
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The year-old pit bull was a lover, not a fighter — which is not good when your owner is a cretin.
“I’m a fighter and my dog’s got to be a fighter, too,” he told the young homeless couple in the park. “I’ve got no use for him. You want him?”
Sure, said Shaggy and Bubbles (their street names). They could use a little more protection living out here — even from a dog that would rather lick your face than attack it. (Click here for full article.)

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She's Dedicating Her Life to Helping Homeless People and Their Animals by, Rhona Melsky



National News Briefs,   


By Jesse Call


Photo: Deadly Sirius.

In Colorado Springs, Colorado, two teenagers allegedly shined a flashlight on a man sleeping in a culvert and then shot him twice before fleeing, KRDO reports. Two of the several shots fired hit Gerald Shinkle in the leg and backside. Shinkle, wounded, said he chased after the teens before he collapsed from pain. A friend found him nine hours later and he was taken to a hospital. Now released, Shinkle said he cannot afford the medication needed to help his wounds heal and stay clean. He fears he will have to return to the hospital but is reluctant to do so because he does not “want to put a bill on somebody else when I know I can’t pay.” The perpetrators remain at large.

Albert Curtis Sanchez, 21, has been sentenced to serve the remainder of his life in prison for the 2009 murder of 48-year-old Timothy Lee Acorn in Redding, California. Sanchez was convicted of beating Alcorn to death in a plan “to kick a bum’s ass“ and rob him because he was an easy target and police would be unlikely to investigate, according to The Record-Searchlight In a police interrogation video shown to the court, Sanchez admits it “felt good” to beat Alcorn. Two others, Jared Cory Voss and John Hadley Thompson were also convicted in the beating death.

Service providers and advocates of youth in New York City that are forced into homelessness when turned away from their families because they are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgendered are protesting the proposed budget of the city’s mayor, Michael Bloomberg, which calls for a funding cut that would eliminate 160 of the 250 shelter beds for these youth. In a column on HuffingtonPost.com, Carl Siciliano of the Ali Forney Center, writes: “I wonder if the mayor understands what it means to put a kid on the street. Does he know that many will be forced to resort to prostituting themselves in order to survive? Does he know that 20 percent of the LGBT kids will become infected with HIV on the streets? Does he know that 60 percent will consider or attempt suicide?” If the budget passes, Siciliano says he will lead a campout protest near Bloomberg’s home so he will see the “human wreckage of his budget.”

A veteran who once walked the streets of downtown Augusta, Georgia, without a home is now patrolling those same streets as a deputy sheriff less than one year later. The Augusta Chronicle outlines the story of Deputy Ryan Jones, his wife and two kids as they entered and then overcame homelessness through creativity and hard work. Like many families, their period of homelessness, brought on when mold was discovered in their home and they lacked funds to make repairs, forced them to stay in separate locations until they got back on their feet. Now Jones said he is excited to have a patrol car of his own. “Walking?” he told the Chronicle,. “I think I’ve done enough of that.”

A woman who experienced homelessness in southern California has now created a 112-page resource guide for people battling homelessness and has also formed her own non-profit organization, according to the Daily News Los Angeles. Angel Hanz For the Homeless, Inc., seeks to fill what she saw as a gap in services for homeless people with pets. Karen Hamza formed the organization which helps by providing extra food, directing people to shelters that welcome pets, and hooking people up with volunteers to foster and care for animals while people secure housing. “Their pets are everything to them,” she said, remembering the long days and nights of homelessness with her dog Tippy. “Sometimes, it’s the only thing they have.”

Reprinted from Streetvibes, Cincinnati's Alternative News Source
http://streetvibes.wordpress.com/2012/05/14/national-news-briefs/

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Thanks to Cesar Millan for the acknowledgement of Angel Hanz for the Homeless in his magazine, Cesar's Way
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Helping the Homeless and Their Dogs in LA

By Michael Barmish

Across the United States, the number of homeless residents on the street is a growing issue in our most populated cities. But oftentimes the problem of homeless dogs, whether they’re companions to a homeless person or strays that roam the streets, is overshadowed by these numbers.
Los Angeles is no stranger to this predicament. Currently, there are around 30,000 stray dogs wandering around LA. Not only are these dogs hungry and mistreated, but also the bill to taxpayers to round them up, treat them, and, sadly, kill them, is an estimated $2 billion annually nationwide.
Fortunately, there are programs to help. One such program is Downtown Dog Rescue. Formed over fifteen years ago for the specific purpose of assisting homeless dog owners, Downtown Dog Rescue focuses on areas of downtown Los Angeles, including Skid Row.

The program assists with medical care, such as spaying and neutering, vaccinations, dog licensing, and microchip implants, as well as other services for dogs of the homeless. The organization has ongoing adoption events, dog clinics, and various fundraisers throughout the year.

The STAND Foundation, which is an acronym for Stop Torture Abuse & Neglect of Dogs, is a Los Angeles non-profit whose mission is to provide care for animals of the homeless as well as improve the living conditions of neglected guard dogs. An all-volunteer charity, STAND Foundation also provides access to low-cost medical assistance low-income pet owners.

Angel Hanz for the Homeless is another Los Angeles-based non-profit dedicated to bettering the lives of homeless individuals and their pets. Their philosophy is every pet and every person should be treated with respect and dignity.

Founder Karen Hamza, herself once homeless, organizes various events to provide essential needs to the homeless and their pets, including meals, and blankets and clothing to keep people and their pets warm during cold nights.

What can you do to help? These and other organizations will always accept donations, whether cash or even food donations. Pets of the Homeless has an extensive list of volunteer collection site members that will collect pet food and supplies that will distribute donations to local food banks, pantries, soup kitchens and homeless shelters. It’s a great way for everyone to do their small part for this big problem.
[Article and photo credit: Cesar's Way] 

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Angels Working for Animals in Need


It's becoming recognized more and more of late that, for those suffering from emotional/mental disabilities, the solace offered by Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) is priceless. Not restricted to Service Animals, such as seeing-eye dogs, these companions give unparalleled unconditional love and emotional support.
In many instances, the human companions ("owners" is such an unfriendly word in referring to animals!) of ESAs are also in need of protection. Often this is not only due to living alone or in a high-crime neighborhood, where an animal could alert others to an intruder's presence, or act defensively. Many of those with ESAs are actually homeless. In such circumstances, even a cat will awake a human when, for example, a potential attacker approaches in the night.

When the human/animal bond is so strong--as happens a lot since they depend on each other for daily survival--giving up your companion to enter a shelter isn't always an option. Homeless people with animals, then, have additional problems to be addressed, such as adequate and safe food, water bowls, and occasional veterinary services.

That's where Angel Hanz for the Homeless comes in. This charitable organization, founded by Karen Hamza of the San Fernando Valley, exists to aid the homeless who have decided to stand by their loyal companions of other species. Having experienced living in a car with her own dogs a few years ago, Karen understands the dilemma faced by these people.

On the last Sunday (NOTE: not the 4th Sunday) of each month, Angel Hanz for the Homeless arrives at about noon, on the north side of North Hollywood Park, along Magnolia Avenue (near the picnic tables, just east of the 170 freeway ramp). She and her small staff of volunteers set out items donated for the homeless and their animals, such as dog and cat food (both canned and dry), pet toys, hygiene kits for humans, and assorted other goods. Sometimes other services are available as well, like a legal advisor, or holistic pet healer (Navah Raphael of PawsofLight.com).

This charity is always in need of donations, both in terms of cash and good usable by indigent humans and animals. Currently, Ms. Hamza has a very pressing major need: a working vehicle to use strictly for the organization's purposes. This may be written off on the donor's taxes.

To enquire regarding helping this charity, contact Karen Hamza at:
P.O. Box 10716, Burbank, CA 91510
Ph.: 818-358-3663/818-859-4893
Email: angelhanzhamza@juno.com

See the website: www.angelhanzla.blogspot.com

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Feeding The Homeless Banned In Major Cities All Over America

[article and photos from The Economic Collapse Blog]


What would you do if you came across someone on the street that had not had anything to eat for several days?  Would you give that person some food?  Well, the next time you get that impulse you might want to check if it is still legal to feed the homeless where you live.  Sadly, feeding the homeless has been banned in major cities all over America.  Other cities that have not banned it outright have put so many requirements on those that want to feed the homeless (acquiring expensive permits, taking food preparation courses, etc.) that feeding the homeless has become "out of reach" for most average people.  Some cities are doing these things because they are concerned about the "health risks" of the food being distributed by ordinary "do-gooders".  Other cities are passing these laws because they do not want homeless people congregating in city centers where they know that they will be fed.  But at a time when poverty and government dependence are soaring to unprecedented levels, is it really a good idea to ban people from helping those that are hurting?  Read more.

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The Pet Press Letters to the Editor
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"Help for the Homeless Offered"

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"All Living Things Need Care" by Vickie Jackson
"Today a little life--a cuddly-looking white dog, possibly a Bichon Frise or poodle mix--nearly was nothing but trash in Sun Valley Park. Half way through the morning, when a local homeless woman was searching for recyclables in the trash barrels, she found the shivering, injured older male dog wrapped in a newspaper and shoved in a paper shopping bag. He'd been dumped in a trash barrel along Vineland in front of the park. Needless to say, he was frightened and in bad shape. Apparently "Andrew"--designated by his finder by that name as today is St. Andrew's Day--had an injured hind leg and seemed to have eye injuries consistent with being poked by some object. Poor little doggie also had pink stains on his white, matted fur, signs of some bleeding.

"Andrew" was wearing a blue nylon collar minus any ID tags, plus a black sweater with a skull and roses design on back. His front legs were bound by the bag's handles and he could barely hold up his head. A call to 911 and transfer to Animal Services brought help more than half an hour later. In the meantime the finder called a variety of others who she asked for help. She also attempted to get passerby to intervene. Few even stopped. She held him in her jacket, ignoring her own feelings of coldness, and told him she loved him and wouldn't leave him to die alone.

Not long before his rescue, the little guy began to fail; his head, struggling to rise, drooped. His injured eyes no longer were open. Fortunately, Animal Services came in time; the AS employee assured his friend he would not likely be put down but looked like he could be saved and adopted out. (It's highly unlikely whoever left "Andrew" to die will claim him if they are found.)

What kind of person, for lack of a printable word, would have so little regard for any creature's life to leave it to die in a trash can? Even if the little dog was injured accidentally, a slow death in such a manner is horrific and inexcusable. Euthanasia, while undesirable, is preferable and more merciful than suffocation, internal bleeding, and a lonely demise with no loving touch to ease the pain and fear. Could someone have even been sick enough to deliberately committed such an atrocity? This was the second trashed dog since the Labor Day weekend found by someone in a Valley park; the first one was already dead, in North Hollywood Park.

We can't expect those who have such a callous attitude to have any better regard for human life. Either you have a heart for those who are suffering despite their species or you don't. Deliberately causing a trusting, loving little creature like a companion dog or cat to suffer, then abandoning it to die in the garbage is inexcusible--and oh, yeah--punishable by law. In California and all other states, it brings a prison sentence upon conviction.

Hopefully little "Andrew" will recover soon and be adopted by a loving human who will let him spend the rest of his life in a secure, happy home. Maybe that will help erase the horrible memories of this day.

Thanks to the following for helping "Andrew":

911 Dispatch (LA County)
Animal Services
Angel Hanz for the Homeless (angelhanzhamza@juno.com)"

View Vickie Jackson's blog post here.

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Angel Hanz Newspaper Clippings:
"Tips for the Cold Weather Season" by Karen Hamza



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The Power of Friendships Karen ‘Angel Hanz" Hamza
The powerful effects that friendship has on the body and psyche are commonly known around the world. The proof is in the pudding. Social support in society heals ones' sense of well-being while loneliness, isolation and stress play havoc with the immune system and predispose people to all forms of illness such as cancer, heart attacks, high blood pressure and the like. When there is no one to communicate with, life’s burdens remain inside, festering and creating all kinds of inner turmoil. But finding that special ‘someone’, that friend to share our problems with allows us to reduce those burdens and the entire body changes and improves. (Anything that disturbs the mind causes problems for the body and the mind.)
Giving to others with an open mind and heart heals the isolation that appears to separate us from each other. Love and kindness towards others, not only makes others feel loved but it helps us to develop an inner happiness and peace. The healing value of a touch, even a simple pat on the back is beneficial as, the body recognizes this as nurturing. Then you have the therapeutic touch at the core that is the offering of unconditional love and compassion. The most fundamental longing of the human heart is for Union with the Divine.
Anytime a hug or touch is given, boundaries must be considered. In the United States more so than in other countries it seems as if people are not as connected. Our fast-paced society and modern technology, has created more separation than ever. Another fact to be recognized are the healing benefits of having pets, animals. Folks that have pets live longer and are much healthier.
This brings me to the point of my organization and how that I assist the homeless and their pets. The unfortunate ones that have pets take good care of their animals. It gives the homeless something to love and care for which therefore, empowers them in moving forward in their survival mode. I have heard numerous times from the homeless if they did not have their pets that they would be totally lost. It is all about love and giving.
I have made so many wonderful friends that have warmed my heart and have left me over joyed. For me it is in the giving that the healing begins. I just love it. Being homeless at one period in my life, I comprehend the state of needing love and support. I am there to give what is most needed to the homeless and their pets. It is amazing as, we have a mutual respect for each other. They have been there for me as well. A win, win friendship as, those are truly the best. Not always are folks able to give back and that is okay. Once again, it is in the giving that the healing begins!
I shall list some of the characteristics of healing, healthy friendships: Open communication-Balance-Compassion-Honesty-Faithfulness-Mutual respect-Kindness-Loyalty-listening-Complimentary-Feeling safe to confide-Not prejudice-Motivating-Shared activities-Fun-Trust-Patience-Not robbing one of their feelings-Validating-Appreciating--Loving-Giving-Supportive-Able to genuinely be yourself. These are only a few.. Now, that we have some tools to work with, lets' get out there and touch someone’s' heart today not to mention our own.
Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.‛ - Albert Camus.
 Donations for this non-profit organization, that never forgets about the PETS, would be much appreciated: ANGEL HANZ FOR THE HOMELESS, INC.-P.O. BOX 10716-BURBANK CA-91510 818-358-3663
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If you would like more information on gatherings, events, etc., please search on www.google.com for ANGEL HANZ FOR THE HOMELESS, INC. [Never Forgets About The Pets], ANGEL HANZ, and Karen Hamza.


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"Tens Of Millions Of American Families Are Living On The Edge Of Desperation - And The Economy Is About To Get A Whole Lot Worse" from The Economic Collapse Blog
"Have you ever been so poor that you had to live in your car? Have you ever been so low on funds that the only place you could afford to live was a rat-infested motel? Have you ever spent a night living in a tent city or sleeping in the streets? If not, you should consider yourself to be very fortunate. As the recent Black Friday madness demonstrated, there are still lots of Americans that are doing well enough to go on wild shopping sprees, but the reality is that there are also millions of American families that are falling through the "safety net" to a place of total desperation...." Read more here.

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Many Of You Will Not Believe 
Some Of The Things Americans Are Doing Just To Survive

"You might not want to read this article if you have a weak stomach.  Most Americans have absolutely no idea what is going on in the dark corners of America, and when people find out the truth it can come as quite a shock.  Many of you will not believe some of the things Americans are doing just to survive.  Some families are living in sewers and drain tunnels, some families are living in tents, some families are living in their cars, some families will make ketchup soup for dinner tonight and some families are even eating rats.  Some homeless shelters in America are so overloaded that they are actually sending people out to live in the woods.  As you read this, there are close to 50 million Americans that are living below the poverty line, and that number rises a little bit more every single day.  America was once known as the greatest nation on earth, but now there is decay and economic despair almost everywhere you look.  Yes, money certainly cannot buy happiness, but the lack of it sure can bring a lot of pain.  As the economy continues to decline, the suffering that we see all around us is going to get a lot worse, and that is a very frightening thing to think about.
Those of us that still live comfortably are often completely unaware of what life is like out on the streets of America at this point.
There are millions upon millions of Americans that have lost all hope and that are living on the very edge of life and death.